Essay

Amazon.com: THINK Critically (9780205738458): Peter Facione: Books

I have enjoyed watching this book progress from the first chapter to the last, and I honestly cannot wait to teach it. I am proud to have been a part of it (though of course in my very little way). I had the experience of reading precisely the sort of text I would like to write.

--John Gibson, University of Louisville

Excellent. I was pleased to see the book conclude with a nice, meaty discussion of empirical reasoning that will help students understand how to apply the lessons of CT to material they will encounter in courses in the hard and soft sciences.

--John Gibson, University of Louisville

One of the greatest strengths of this text is the author’s emphasis throughout the text on critical thinking in real life, supported by thoughtful, engaging examples and exercises from real life situations.

--Anne Glauser, University of Georgia

Other texts just discuss inductive reasoning. Approaching it by way of empirical reasoning makes the discussion seem smarter and newer (or at least: less tired and boring)

--John Gibson, University of Louisville

I can not think of a better presentation on the steps involved in logically and systematically investigating an empirical question. Students will learn how to recognize empirical reasoning, explore the necessary steps involved in conducting an investigation scientifically, and about the benefits and risks of empirical reasoning.

--Anne Glauser, University of Georgia

This chapter's streamlined and straightforward style is a help to comprehending the complexities of this topic and I think students might prefer it.

--John Kimsey, DePaul University

This is the best introduction to CT I have read. I especially liked the section on CT and the free society & and the absolutely necessary section on CT does NOT = Negative Thinking… It outdoes Moore and Parker, who are very good at this sort of thing.

-John Gibson, University of Louisville

This prose is much more readable and accessible than the text I am currently using. I am certain that my students would prefer this text.

-Stephanie Semler, Radford University

I use a developmental approach to teach critical thinking. The approach of the chapter is a good fit with my curriculum. I like the pragmatic approach coupled with all of the engaging, relevant examples that are scattered throughout the chapter. Students will enjoy reading about the recent legislation and debating whether or not the Kennedy National Service Act is a good idea. I address volunteerism in my course so I am pleased to see this information presented within this chapter. Chapter one offers a good introduction to the importance of developing critical thinking skills and the right disposition to make good judgments.

-Ann Glauser, University of Georgia

The strengths of this chapter are its simplicity, directness and emphasis on how critical thinking fits into everyday life and responsible citizenship. In my course I make the same points, particularly the one about responsible citizenship, and I also like to refer to current events and popular culture, so yes--the chapter would work with the way I design and structure my course.

-John Kimsey, DePaul University

It is informative, it gives a VERY good sense of the point of CT, and the material is germane yet light and witty. It manages to introduce substantive issues gently, and it gives the student the sense that course might actually be fun.

- John Gibson, University of Louisville

The chapter's style is more hip than that of my current text. I think my students would prefer this style.

- John Kimsey, DePaul University

Yes, the purpose of the chapter is to advance students’ thinking. This chapter will accomplish this in an engaging, entertaining way. The students will have fun with Carlin’s language. Students will be motivated to think more critically. The chapter offers a good, solid definition of critical thinking…”the process of purposeful, self-regulatory judgment.” I think that the rubric needs to be better explained so that students use it as effectively as possible to evaluate critical thinking. Through reading this chapter, students can learn how to better analyze others’ ideas and how to monitor their own thinking.

-Ann Glauser, University of Georgia

Compared to the comparable section in my current book, this chapter is much more attuned to political issues of the day and much more emphatic about the connection between CT, citizenship and achieving a functional democracy.

- John Kimsey, DePaul University

The approach of the chapter is a good fit with my curriculum. The chapter provides a good overall introduction into specific critical thinking skills. Students and instructors will appreciate the way critical thinking skills have been broken down into six basic thinking skills (interpretation, analysis, inference, evaluation, explanation, and self-regulation).

-Ann Glauser, University of Georgia

“Information about inductive and deductive reasoning that appears on pages 10 and 11 presents the best definitions that I have seen in texts on critical thinking. Students will no longer confuse the two concepts after reading about them.”

-Ann Glauser, University of Georgia

The text I use does not contain this material (a treatment of CR from the standpoint of habits of mind). It is a welcome addition to what is currently available. I think students will appreciate it.

-John Gibson, University of Louisville

I especially like the way the author manages to cover many of the topics traditionally covered in a chapter on definitions & vagueness & ambiguity without using jargon. A traditional text would ask students to memorize the meanings of terms like "stipulative definition," "rhetorical definition," "precising definition," and so on. This text introduces these concepts through a discussion of examples of how these sorts of definitions might be necessary in ordinary life. I think this will be much more accessible to students than the usual way of introducing these concepts, which leads (in my experience) to students obsessing about getting the definitions of the concepts exactly right and failing to see how the concepts apply in real life situations. I also like that the chapter focuses on real-life cases of ambiguity, not the contrived sorts of examples of ambiguity that one typically finds in textbooks but never in real life (headlines like "Child's Stool Useful in Garden"). Also, this chapter does an excellent job of showing that vagueness and ambiguity are not always problematic. I have encountered many students who, having learned about vagueness & ambiguity, start to see vagueness everywhere -- and think that it is always problematic. It would be very helpful to have a textbook which points out the importance of context, as this one does.

-Deborah Boyle, College of Charleston

The text continuously provides creative, relevant examples that fortify the concepts being

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taught and emphasize critical thinking in real life situations. Students often do not see the relevance of some of the courses they need to take in the core curriculum. Students will find that relevance in a course using this text because the text takes such a pragmatic approach to building positive habits of the mind. This chapter continues with the idea put forth in chapter 3 that critical thinking skills need to be exercised to become stronger like any other skill.

-Ann Glauser, University of Georgia

The emphasis on everyday reasoning as well as on structured analysis of discourse fits with my approach. I also like to reference current events and examples from popular culture and again the chapter is in line with this approach.

-John Kimsey, DePaul University

Yes. I like the multimedia approach (i.e., the use of video clips, pictures, and comics). Throughout the chapter students will enjoy learning about critical thinking from multimedia presentations (i.e., clips from The Daily Show and Law and Order) and wonderful, relevant examples from a student deciding about enrolling in ROTC to the High Sierra Hikers planning their camping trip.

-Ann Glauser, University of Georgia

The chapter contains numerous concrete examples and this is a strength because it helps ground the abstract concepts in reader-friendly specifics.

-John Kimsey, DePaul Unversity

I think that the approach is useful and compelling. Students will be engaged with the concrete examples that the chapter begins with. I also like the methodic outlay of ideas in the chapter

-Stephanie Semler, Radford University

The material strengthens the overall engaging approach to helping students develop strong critical thinking habits. Students are given opportunities through the exercise to learn how to give strong explanations for why something is or is no. On page eight, the discussion on the processes of reflecting, analyticity, inquisitiveness, self-monitoring, and self-correcting is well placed, adding continuity to the chapters.

-Ann Glauser, University of Georgia

The scope and sequence are right. I love the way the chapter starts off with such a focused, intense example (Morris Dees and Selma Goncalves). Beginning with the first sentence, students are introduced to the notion of how important it is to evaluate any claims being made and assess credibility of the source. The continued use of video clips offers great continuity between the chapters. The summary of the chapter as well as the next steps is helpful in organizing the material covered and preparing for the future readings.

-Ann Glauser, University of Georgia

Yes, it is precisely what I am looking for. Every concept and idea is well taught. I believe that students are often quite reluctant to learning about these two major forms of arguments (inductive and deductive) and the fallacies associated with them. This chapter does an excellent job of presenting the material clearly, reinforcing all the concepts throughout the chapter with well placed, creative exercises, and reiterating important ideas associated with critical thinking (i.e., the four qualities of an acceptable argument so that students can understand and implement them in their own thinking and the four questions that need to be asked to discover if a sampling is adequate to support probabilistic inferences that have been drawn).

-Ann Glauser, University of Georgia

Excellent. Again I appreciate how the author goes back to important concepts and takes the time to communicate them using a different format (i.e., exercises, diagrams, and summaries) to reinforce student learning. This material would be difficult for some students to master without the logical way in which the information is organized.

-Ann Glauser, University of Georgia

Extremely original and helpful approach. Calling these kinds of reasoning (snap judgements) as heuristic devices instead of fallacies is very smart (many of things Moore and Parker call fallacies are, in the appropriate context, not really mistakes in reasoning). This is a much better way to get at the same thing.

-John Gibson, University of Louisville

This chapter would work with the way I design my course, yes. It's a particularly interesting and fun chapter and it's significant because cognitive heuristics is an important topic and one that's not covered in many Critical Thinking texts.

-John Kimsey, DePaul University

The organization is exceptional. I can't recommend any improvements.

-Michael Monge, Long Beach City College

It is ahead of the pack…it represents a significant improvement over Moore and Parker.  This is much better and much more original. Students will love it.

-John Gibson, University of Louisville

Not only would it work, but it would enhance my curriculum. This is an excellent chapter that could stand alone as a guide for anyone who is faced with the process of selecting the best option among a variety of choices. The information in this chapter related to dominance structuring was a reminder to me to be more aware of my decision making processes and those of my colleagues during the next search committee .I think that many of us forget how the process of dominance structuring can unknowingly wedge us into making bad decisions. We all need to avoid the dominant structure around just one option. This chapter may need to be required reading for all committee members. Excellent information about the continued need for self-regulation and the search for truth for students and everyone else.

-Ann Glauser, University of Georgia

Yes, the author is gifted in doing this [creating exercises]. Instructors will use all of the exercises.

-Ann Glauser, University of Georgia

Through the use of creative and thoughtful exercises, students are guided through a series of well synthesized informative sections on comparative reasoning. Exercises and examples are placed appropriately throughout the chapter. Having this chapter presented along with chapters 12 on ideological inferences and chapter 13 on empirical inferences makes good sense and brings continuity to these basic reasoning patterns.

-Ann Glauser, University of Georgia

This is NOTHING like this in the other books. Now that one sees it (= a focused discussion of 'ideological' reasoning), it seems so obvious. But I think it is entirely novel. At any rate, I am excited to try it out in the classroom. I will definitely use this text when it comes out.

-John Gibson, University of Louisville

Yes. The chapter covers everything that I would cover in my course and then some. Information within the text thoroughly covers how empirical reasoning is used to explain, predict or control what happens, and how accurate predictions enable us to anticipate what is likely to happen under certain conditions. I like how the author emphasizes within this chapter and throughout the text the importance of communicating our ideas and explanations.

-Ann Glauser, University of Georgia


Category: Critical thinking

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